holding you as steady as I can

A membrane sensitive to waves of available light and air, a divining rod for the intangible presence of what is always there, unremarked, between my outstretched hands.

2016, edition of 20

Exhibited at Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain, 2016; Art Toronto, 2016; Papier Montréal 2017; Flowers Gallery, New York, 2017

https://www.flowersgallery.com/exhibitions/view/no-lemon-no-melon-summer-exhibition

résidence

 

 

 

 

in situ project and collection of video sketches
projet in-situ et collection de séquences-vidéos

2018

at Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain, Montréal, Qc

Immersed in the daily life of the gallery for four weeks I made something that won’t last (nothing lasts) but in the clear understanding that we must keep making things, as a way to focus delicately but with fierce determination on where we are (I am) now.
It’s made slowly, changes continually with changes in daylight and air, is responsive.
The marvel is what’s always, already here, all around us. 

article de Marie-Ève Charron, Le Devoir, 21 avril 2018
https://www.ledevoir.com/culture/arts-visuels/525676/karilee-fuglem-dessine-un-espace-vide-et-tangible

Fuglem-résidence–being–here-plan

Fuglem-résidence-being_here-text

see also / en plus :

existing conditions / conditions existantes

 

existing conditions / conditions existantes

Solo exhibition at Centre d’art Expression, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, 2017.

“In this room, a skylight, a big door with a sun motif lintel, and a stair apparently not going to or coming from anywhere but the wall and ceiling. Already so much to contemplate, the air trickling or rushing past us, the sun pouring in one day, subdued the next. I’m thinking about this room, its sometimes wildly circulating air, and how we make things move or appear to move by our own passage through this place, changing everything a little just by being here.

At the core of this, existing light and air. Existing light the name for taking photographs without flash or floodlights, a practise I followed at first because I couldn’t afford flash or floodlights, and eventually came to prefer the changeability and mood swings of natural light.

There’s a web of thread that remembers a body’s contours, made while mourning my mom, and a series of ongoing photographs where I try to capture what it is to be with my aging dad, moments translucent with conversation during my brief visits. A wall of interleaving tissue wafts gently when you pass by, sensuously responding to your presence. A cycle of video clips take us back to the observed world where shadows and light project like ongoing movies onto everything, all the time.

And here I am, and here you are. I want to hold us all still for a moment, slow things down a bit. So hard to see what is always here, wherever here is. So hard to pay attention to everyday things that seem like nothing, but are everything.”

Karilee Fuglem, May 12, 2017

 

Booklet with text by Andrew Forster  (In English and French/ en anglais et français)
Fuglem-Existing Conditions – brochure

reviews:

by Jérôme Delgado, Le Devoir, Montréal:
http://www.ledevoir.com/culture/arts-visuels/504926/arts-visuels-vide-et-plein-de-vie

by Olivier Dénommée, Le Courrier de Saint-Hyacinthe:
http://www.lecourrier.qc.ca/stha01-13-07-17-9029/regarder-invisible-a-expression

 

 

 

Air de réflexion

Permanent installation at the new Centre hospitalier de l’université de Montréal, 2017

A network of lines, each the length of outstretched arms, form an entity with its own weight, logic and reflectivity. Its internal structure is a path marked out by Ursa Major and Minor over the course of thousands of years, as they would be glimpsed above us, midwinter night. Waiting in a hospital feels like forever, while out there stars move so slowly compared to us they may as well be eternal. We recognize them wordlessly, call them by names from Greek and Arabic, our many languages bringing us closer than they push us apart. 

Stainless steel. Manufactured slowly by hand with the help of Lalie Douglas and Jo-Anne Balcaen. Thanks also to Louis Dumontier, Ariel Dumontier and their team, and to Lucas Fuglem, Adèle Fuglem and Louis Barrette.